Worries As Omicron Coronavirus Spreads - THE DAILY CRUCIBLE

Breaking

Ads


Sunday, November 28, 2021

Worries As Omicron Coronavirus Spreads

    •Mohammed Murtala Int'l Airport


The Daily Crucible | Published Monday, November 29, 2021

Since the heavily mutated variant, Omicron, was detected in South Africa earlier this month and then reported to the World Health Organization (WHO) last Wednesday, the variant has been identified as being responsible for most of the infections found in South Africa's most populated province, Gauteng, over the last 14 days, and is now found in all other provinces of the country.

 Japan has reinstated tough border restrictions, banning all foreigners from entering the country from 30 November and it is not yet clear what steps Nigerian Government has taken to restrict movements through the nation's seaports, airports and land borders against the spread of Omicron coronavirus variant.

However, the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) on Sunday said that the newly discovered SARS-CoV-2 variant of concern of the coronavirus infection- B.1.1.529 lineage, Omicron, has not been detected in the country.

NCDC, however, warned Nigerians against throwing safety caution to the wind, advising them to avoid visiting countries where cases have been reported including South Africa, Botswana, Italy, Germany, Belgium and the United Kingdom.

In a statement yesterday by the center's  director-general, Ifedayo Adetifa, he said NCDC is monitoring emerging evidence alongside the federal ministry of health on the new variant and its implication “to inform Nigeria’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.”

The centre noted that the dangerous variant has no fatality figure has been associated to the new variant, but admitted that it has high mutations and transmissibilities capabilities and that a total of 126 genomes of the variant has been identified so far.

 “Considering the highly likely increased transmissibility of the Omicron variant and its emergence that is linked to unmitigated community transmission of the virus, the NCDC urges Nigerians to ensure strict adherence to the proven public health and social measures in place, which are enforceable by the Presidential Steering Committee on COVID-19 (PSC-COVID-19), through the COVID-19 Health Protection Regulations 2021.

“Given the high number of mutations present in this Omicron variant and the exponential rise in COVID-19 cases observed in South Africa, this virus is considered highly transmissible and may also present an increased risk of reinfection compared to other variants of concern (VOCs).

“However, the fears about its ability to evade protective immune responses and/or its being vaccine-resistant are only theoretical so far. This virus can still be detected with existing Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) tests.

“The WHO and researchers across the world are working at speed to gain an understanding of the likely impact of this variant on the severity of COVID-19 and on the potency of existing vaccines and therapeutics.

“Adhere to public health and social measures that have been proven to help prevent SARS-COV-2 infection regardless of the circulating variant. These include, wearing face masks, especially in crowded settings, washing hands regularly, physical distancing from others where possible during good ventilation, avoid travel to countries where there is a surge in COVID-19 cases or reported cases of the Omicron variant, and avoid all non-essential travel both local and international.

“If you must travel, please adhere to travel protocols instituted by the PSC-COVID-19 which are in place to prevent the risk of importation of the virus or its variants to Nigeria,” NCDC stated.

Mr Adetifa appealed to business owners, religious leaders and people in authority “to take responsibility by ensuring people in their premises wear masks and adhere to physical distancing.

“We must do all we can to protect ourselves and our country."

But the WHO has warned against countries hastily imposing travel curbs, saying they should look to a "risk-based and scientific approach". However, numerous bans have been introduced in recent days amid concerns over the variant.

WHO's Africa director Matshidiso Moeti said on Sunday: "With the Omicron variant now detected in several regions of the world, putting in place travel bans that target Africa attacks global solidarity."

Dutch health authorities said the 13 cases of the Omicron coronavirus variant were found among people on two flights that arrived in Amsterdam from South Africa on Friday.

The Omicron coronavirus variant spread around the world on Sunday, with new cases found in the Netherlands, Denmark and Australia even as more countries imposed travel restrictions to try to seal themselves off.

The World Health Organization (WHO) said it is not yet clear whether Omicron, first detected in Southern Africa, is more transmissible than other variants, or if it causes more severe disease.

"Preliminary data suggests that there are increasing rates of hospitalization in South Africa, but this may be due to increasing overall numbers of people becoming infected, rather than a result of specific infection," WHO said.

WHO said understanding the level of severity of Omicron "will take days to several weeks."

The detection of Omicron triggered global alarm as governments around the world scrambled to impose new travel restrictions and markets sold off, fearing the variant could resist vaccinations and upend a nascent economic reopening after a two-year global pandemic.

Passengers queue at the Kenya Airways ticket sales counter to book flights as several airlines have stopped flying out of South Africa, amidst the spread of the new SARS-CoV-2 variant Omicron, at O.R. Tambo International Airport in Johannesburg, South Africa, November 28, 2021.

 Just yesterday, passengers queue at the Kenya Airways ticket sales counter to book flights as several airlines have stopped flying out of South Africa, amidst the spread of the new SARS-CoV-2 variant Omicron, at O.R. Tambo International Airport in Johannesburg, South Africa, November 28, 2021. 

In its statement, the WHO said it was working with technical experts to understand the potential impact of the variant on existing countermeasures against COVID-19, including vaccines.

Britain said it will convene an urgent meeting of G7 health ministers on Monday to discuss the developments.

Dutch health authorities said 13 cases of the variant were found among people on two flights that arrived in Amsterdam from South Africa on Friday.

Authorities had tested all of the more than 600 passengers on those two flights and had found 61 coronavirus cases, going on to test those for the new variant.

"This could possibly be the tip of the iceberg," Health Minister Hugo de Jonge told reporters in Rotterdam.
Omicron, dubbed a "variant of concern" last week by the WHO that is potentially more contagious than previous variants, has now been detected in Australia, Belgium, Botswana, Britain, Denmark, Germany, Hong Kong, Israel, Italy, the Netherlands and South Africa.

Many countries have imposed travel bans or curbs on southern Africa to try to stem the spread. Financial markets dived on Friday, and oil prices tumbled.

A South African doctor who was one of the first to suspect a different coronavirus strain said on Sunday that symptoms of Omicron were so far mild and could be treated at home.
Dr. Angelique Coetzee, chair of South African Medical Association, told Reuters that unlike with Delta, so far patients have not reported loss of smell or taste and there has been no major drop in oxygen levels with the new variant.

ISRAELI MEASURES

In the most far-reaching effort to keep the variant at bay, Israel announced late on Saturday it would ban the entry of all foreigners and reintroduce counter-terrorism phone-tracking technology to contain the spread of the variant.

Prime Minister Naftali Bennett said the ban, pending government approval, would last 14 days. Officials hope that within that period there will be more information on how effective vaccines are against Omicron.

The top US infectious disease official, Dr. Anthony Fauci, said Americans should be prepared to fight the spread of the new variant, but that it was not yet clear what measure such as mandates or lockdowns would be needed. He has said the variant is likely already in the country, although no cases have been confirmed.

In Britain, the government has announced measures including stricter testing rules for people arriving in the country and requiring mask-wearing in some settings.
British health minister Sajid Javid said on Sunday he expected to receive advice imminently on whether the government can broaden a program of providing booster shots to fully vaccinated people, to try to weaken the impact of the variant.

More countries announced new travel curbs on southern African nations on Sunday, including Indonesia and Saudi Arabia.
South Africa has denounced the measures as unfair and potentially harmful to its economy, saying it is being punished for its scientific ability to identify coronavirus variants early.

South Africa's President Cyril Ramaphosa said on Sunday that his government was considering imposing compulsory COVID-19 shots for people in certain places and activities, and he slammed rich Western countries for their knee-jerk imposition of travel bans.

"The prohibition of travel is not informed by science, nor will it be effective in preventing the spread of this variant," Ramaphosa said. "The only thing (it) ... will do is to further damage the economies of the affected countries and undermine their ability to respond to ... the pandemic."

Omicron has emerged as many countries in Europe are already battling a surge in COVID-19 infections, with some reintroducing restrictions on social activity to try to stop the spread.

The new variant has also thrown a spotlight on huge disparities in vaccination rates around the globe. Even as many developed countries are giving third-dose boosters, less than 7% of people in poorer countries have received their first COVID-19 shot, according to medical and human rights groups.

•Additional report from Reuters

No comments:

Post a Comment